additional maternity leave

Maternity Leave: What to Expect When They’re Expecting

Maternity Leave: What to Expect When They’re Expecting

Anne-Marie Slaughter, Hillary Clinton’s former adviser, hit the headlines in April 2017 by claiming a year’s maternity leave is too long for working mothers. Maternity leave is a controversial subject, but communication is vital – particularly for expectant mothers and their employers. Finding cover, training and changes to working hours upon return are just some of the worries employers may have at the back of their mind when a member of staff announces a pregnancy. Eligible women are entitled to up to 52 weeks of maternity leave by law, 39 of which can be paid. Whether you agree that an upper limit of a year is too long, there is little doubt that this period must be adequately planned for. Options The decision of whether to hire a new member of staff on a temporary basis, or cover the r... »

Employers plan October Maternity Extension

Employment consultants Croner Consulting has urged employers affected by 5 October 2008 changes to maternity leave benefits to make plans now. As announced earlier this year, female employees expecting a child on or after 5 October this year will be entitled to non–cash benefits throughout both ordinary maternity leave and additional maternity leave. The employee will now be entitled to any non–cash benefits named in their contract, such as the accrual of annual leave and use of their company car, for the full 52 weeks of maternity leave. This comprises the 26 weeks of ordinary maternity leave and the subsequent 26 weeks, which make up additional maternity leave. Currently, employees on maternity leave only receive their non–cash benefits throughout the 26 weeks of ordina... »