workplace deaths

Workplace Deaths Higher than Official Figures

The Government needs to do more to encourage occupational safety, the Trades Union Congress (TUC) has said, warning that official estimates of deaths at work don’t cover the thousands of fatalities caused indirectly by the workplace. According to the TUC, the figure often given by Government as an indicator of the safety of Britain’s workplaces is the number of workplace deaths that occur at work as a result of injury. This is published by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) every year and in 2009-10 it was 151 ? the lowest ever. However, the TUC’s Case for Health and Safety report claims that at least 20,000 people die early as a result of their work every year ? through conditions such as occupational cancers and lung disorders, exposures to fumes and chemicals, or fatal traffic accide... »

Workplace Deaths Fall to 35-year Low

Workplace Deaths Fall to 35-year Low

The number of people killed at work fell to a record low last year, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has revealed. In the year ending March 2009, 180 people died because of work-related incidents ― down from 233 the previous year ― making it the lowest number since records began in 1974. Workplace injury and sickness levels were also down, the research found. Across England, Scotland and Wales, 29.3 million working days (the equivalent of 1.2 days per worker) were lost to injury and ill health last year, compared with 33.9 million in the previous year. HSE chair, Judith Hackett, welcomed the figures as “encouraging”, but said that the low rates could be partly attributable to reduced activity levels during the recession. “While the recession will undoubte... »