snow

Bosses Face Ghosts of Winters Passed as Snow Causes Havoc – Again

Thousands of small businesses could find their past generosity come back to haunt them this winter as the country prepares for another season of snow and disruption. Many bosses across the country took a lenient view on staff who couldn’t make it into the office after what was billed as the worst snow for 50 years left schools, airports and motorways closed and bus and train services severely disrupted. Now small businesses waking up to more snow this winter may find they rue their past generosity as staff use precedents to claim paid leave in extreme weather, according to employment law experts. Peter Mooney, of business compliance specialist ELAS, said: “The law is very simple when it comes to the weather: if you don’t turn up to work and you’re not ill, you have no right to be pai... »

Snow: Were you Prepared? Did you Suffer?

Snow: Were you Prepared? Did you Suffer?

Over half (58%) of senior decision makers in small businesses in Britain admit their business suffered as a result of the winter weather last week, despite 78% saying they thought their company was prepared to cope with the snow chaos, according to a survey of over 500 senior decision makers in small businesses, commissioned by Citrix GoToMyPC and carried out by YouGov. Some small businesses did take steps to combat the weather conditions and ensure business as usual though, by enabling more staff to work from home (25%) and holding more online meetings (10%). The research does suggest however some small businesses could have done more to prepare for the unexpected, as only 42% said they have a business continuity plan in place. The impact on small businesses has been widespread, with busi... »

Flexible Firms Don’t Suffer During Snow

Flexible Firms Don’t Suffer During Snow

Employers can reduce the impact of the bad weather on their firm’s productivity by allowing staff to work flexibly — that is the message from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) following the longest cold spell in the UK for 30 years. With temperatures falling as low as -18°C and snowfall of more than 16 inches in parts of the UK, many employees across the country decided that the journey to work was too difficult to risk going in to work. However, according to the CIPD, the severe weather does not necessarily have to mean major problems for employers. “Many firms that have put in place the technology and management practices to allow home working reap the benefits at a time like this,” said CIPD organisation and resourcing adviser, Rebec... »