jobs

UK Start-Ups Lead the Way in Job Creation

UK Start-Ups Lead the Way in Job Creation

New businesses in the UK are creating more employment that any other major European country with British start-ups employing over half a million (553,761) people in 2012, according to a research by Rousseau Associates. Britain is now the leading European economy for new business employment, significantly ahead of the next biggest employer France at 398,521 and more than twice the amount of the next two leading countries, Germany and Norway – 346,556 and 17,310 respectively. The report attributed British start-ups’ employment growth to their “ambition and scope” as well as the introduction of the National Insurance (NI) employment allowance and under 21s NI exemption. As the changes to NI have reduced the cost of a business hiring its first employee and enabled employers to reduce their nat... »

Small Businesses Need to Create Jobs Now, says FSB

Small businesses need to start recruiting again if unemployment figures are to reduce — that’s the message from the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), after new figures revealed that women and young people make up the bulk of those out of work at present. Figures from the Office for National Statistics found that unemployment increased by 80,000 in the three months to the end of July this year — to a total of 2.51 million. This is the largest quarterly rise since August 2009. Young people and women have been among the hardest hit, the figures found, with the number of those seeking work rising to 769,000 and 1.06 million respectively. FSB spokesman Andrew Cave said that small firms have historically been more likely to recruit from these two groups than big business. &... »

Foreign Workers Reforms may Restrict Recruitment

Foreign Workers Reforms may Restrict Recruitment

Government plans to limit the number of skilled British jobs going to non-EU workers may make it harder for employers to find the recruits they need, the Forum of Private Business (FPB) has warned. From next year, businesses will be required to advertise jobs in the UK for one month (up from the current two weeks) before they can go ahead and recruit skilled non-EU workers. According to the Home Office, the move will ensure that British workers are not only first in line for jobs, but also have more time in which to apply. But the FPB has warned that the measures may make it harder for employers to find recruits with the right skills, unless education and the current JobCentre system were improved.  “It is certainly important that the domestic jobs market is made more accessible... »