gender

Larger Businesses Must Now Publish Gender Pay Gap Figures

Larger Businesses Must Now Publish Gender Pay Gap Figures

UK businesses with more than 250 staff must now publish how much they pay their male and female workers, as new government legislation comes into effect. Its estimated that gender pay gap reporting will affect 9,000 employers with over 15 million employees – with relevant firms required to submit all data by April 2019. As part of the new regulations, employers will be required to: Publish their median gender pay gap figures Publish their mean gender pay gap figures Publish the proportion of men and women in each quartile of the pay structure Publish the gender pay gaps for any bonuses paid out during the year It’s hoped that such transparency into how companies pay their male and female workers will help end the gender pay gap – which currently stands at 18.1%. Justine Greening, minister ... »

Biased Language In Job Descriptions Prove Businesses Still Hire Candidates Based On Gender

Biased Language In Job Descriptions Prove Businesses Still Hire Candidates Based On Gender

Gender-biased language in job descriptions proves that businesses are still taking a sexist approach to hiring candidates, according to a new study by Adzuna. Their survey, which analysed a selection of traditionally ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ words over one million job applications, revealed that businesses still consider some jobs more suitable for men and some more suitable for women. The most popular masculine words, such as ‘lead’ (410,748), ‘active’ (219,468) and ‘competitive’ (202,188), were more prevalent in job descriptions for sales and consultancy positions – while ‘feminine’ words like ‘support’ (519,187), ‘responsive’ (483,428) and ‘understand’(241,741) were more popular in vacancies for social work, nursing and teaching. When broken down by sector, the tech sector is revealed... »

Gender Pay Gap is Closing

Gender Pay Gap is Closing

Government statistics which found that the difference in average pay levels between men and women narrowed last year are evidence of a longer-term trend that the gender pay gap is closing, according to the Government Equalities Office (GEO). The Office of National Statistics’ (ONS) annual survey of hours and earnings found that men in full-time work earned an average of £12.97 an hour before tax in 2009, compared with £11.39 an hour for women; a difference of 12.2% compared to 12.6% in 2008. A GEO spokesman said the figures indicated a broader trend, with the gender pay gap having shrunk by more than 5% since 1997. “Increased transparency over pay and more firms working towards stamping out unequal pay practices are helping to make an impact.” However, the ONS... »