Top 10 Credit-Crunch Proof Jobs

Research reveals how learning new skills can help safeguard your career…

The latest figures show that 2008 is looking likely to be a year of increased redundancies. Workers in certain industries are more vulnerable to job cuts than others, but all workers could safeguard their careers by developing their skills.

The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development has warned that this year could be the worst for employment since 1997. Retail, consumer product manufacturing, travel and hospitality businesses are usually hardest hit during a credit crunch as people spend less on luxuries and leisure.

Whatever their industry, people can equip themselves to better survive economic uncertainty by taking action now and learning new skills to make them more attractive employees.

Research conducted by the Learning and Skills Council identifies the top five skills that people could brush up on to help them survive the credit crunch. Writing skills topped the list, as employers consider report writing an increasingly crucial skill. The other skills are mental arithmetic, presentation skills, IT competence and leadership skills.

These findings are reflected in the jobs that are least likely to be affected by the credit crunch, which include IT security professionals, software testers, web designers, project managers and business analysts. All these roles are essential to the basic running of any enterprise and therefore less likely to be cut in times of financial shortage.

The top 10 credit-crunch proof jobs in the UK, according to Learning and Skills Council, are:

  • IT Security professional
  • Software tester
  • Network engineer
  • Pharmaceutical/medical sales
  • Web designer
  • Project manager
  • Computer programmer/developer
  • Business analyst
  • Child care worker
  • Viral marketing professional

For more info, visit www.lsc.gov.uk

Top 10 Credit-Crunch Proof Jobs

Research reveals how learning new skills can help safeguard your career…

The latest figures show that 2008 is looking likely to be a year of increased redundancies. Workers in certain industries are more vulnerable to job cuts than others, but all workers could safeguard their careers by developing their skills.

The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development has warned that this year could be the worst for employment since 1997. Retail, consumer product manufacturing, travel and hospitality businesses are usually hardest hit during a credit crunch as people spend less on luxuries and leisure.

Whatever their industry, people can equip themselves to better survive economic uncertainty by taking action now and learning new skills to make them more attractive employees.

Research conducted by the Learning and Skills Council identifies the top five skills that people could brush up on to help them survive the credit crunch. Writing skills topped the list, as employers consider report writing an increasingly crucial skill. The other skills are mental arithmetic, presentation skills, IT competence and leadership skills.

These findings are reflected in the jobs that are least likely to be affected by the credit crunch, which include IT security professionals, software testers, web designers, project managers and business analysts. All these roles are essential to the basic running of any enterprise and therefore less likely to be cut in times of financial shortage.

The top 10 credit-crunch proof jobs in the UK, according to Learning and Skills Council, are:

  • IT Security professional
  • Software tester
  • Network engineer
  • Pharmaceutical/medical sales
  • Web designer
  • Project manager
  • Computer programmer/developer
  • Business analyst
  • Child care worker
  • Viral marketing professional

For more info, visit www.lsc.gov.uk

Top 10 Credit-Crunch Proof Jobs

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